Training for Dog Barking

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Excessive dog barking can become a big headache for dog owners. Nobody wants to be the neighbor with the dog that barks like crazy. To improve your dog’s behavior, the first thing to do is understand it. Dogs bark differently in various situations, and for various reasons. For example, some barking is done to alert the owner of perceived trouble. Other barking is done to get attention. Another reason for dog barking is out of frustration, and they may howl when they are left by themselves.

Dog barking can be a difficult challenge for dog owners to work through, because many of our instincts end up reinforcing their behavior. As an example, let’s take a dog who is barking at a passerby on the street, or another dog. Because we as humans like to nurture, our natural reaction may be to pet the barking dog, to calm him down or soothe him. However, the dog translates this as “you like what I am doing, so I am going to keep doing it.”

On the other hand, some dog owners scold their barking dog by yelling or punishing them. Although this might temporarily suppress the behavior, the problem is that doing this causes the dog further stress, which might make them bark more.

Training Your Barking Dog

In order to train your barking dog, it is important to first identify what his making him or her bark in the first place. For example, if your dog is barking at either something he hears or sees outside, change the environment. Close the curtain so he can’t see outside, or turn on some music to cover up the sounds he is hearing.

Dog barking can be a self-rewarding behavior for your dog. The dog sees it this way. He barks at the mailman, and then the mailman is gone. He thinks he is the cause of making this intruder go away.

Does your dog bark because he is left alone? Experts suggest giving him plenty of exercise before you leave him. You can also try giving him something to keep himself occupied while you are away, such as a food puzzle toy.

For the dog that is barking for attention, try finding something that he can get excited about, like a ball or a toy. This will cause him to bark. After he becomes quiet, give him a reward. This will teach him that he will be rewarded when he is quiet, not when he is barking.

Make a point to reward your dog and give him praise, when he is being calm and quiet. Normally, when dogs are quiet, they can be ignored. However, when they bark, they get lots of attention. Make sure that your dog feels rewarded for being quiet when people walk by outside, and he will be more likely to watch quietly in the future.

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A Large Dog in a Small Apartment

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With a bit of planning, a large dog can live happily and successfully in a small apartment. Help create a positive living experience for you and your large dog with these helpful tips.

Look for the Right Neighborhood

In your search for a rental property, know that some neighborhoods are more welcoming to dogs than others. You should look for a neighborhood that has plenty to offer both you and your canine companion. There needs to be grass nearby, for your dog to relieve himself. There should be places to go on a walk, and perhaps a dog park that isn’t too far away.

When scoping out nearby parks, keep in mind that your dog will need to be kept on a leash at all times. However, if your dog is well-behaved enough to be off the leash, there are off-leash parks available in some locations.

In some neighborhoods, there are dog-friendly places where you can take your dog along with you. Looking for ideas? Some outdoor restaurants allow dogs. If all else fails, most pet supply stores welcome dogs to come along with their owners. Through pet stores, you may find pet classes you can sign up for. This is a great way to meet up with other like-minded individuals.

Finding the Right Apartment

Unfortunately, it is very common to have difficulty finding an apartment that is truly pet-friendly. Now, imagine how hard it might be if you have a 70 pound breed, instead of a little terrier. Having a large dog often makes finding a pet-friendly apartment an even larger challenge. In your search, you will find that many apartment communities have restrictions based on breed, weight and size of the dog.

If you have a large dog, don’t give up! Niccole Schreck of Rent.com offers the following suggestion. Create a resume of sorts for your dog. On paper, describe the personality of your dog, and mention any obedience training completed. Provide proof of vaccinations and overall health. If you can include a recommendation from a prior landlord this may be helpful. Don’t forget to include the most precious photo you can find of your furry friend. She also suggests setting up a meeting with your dog and your landlord, so that they can see how your big dog shouldn’t be seen as threatening. Need an extra boost? Consider getting renter’s insurance to put your landlord’s mind at ease.

Creating a Routine

Dogs are intelligent creatures, and most can adapt to living in an apartment. Creating a routine and sticking to it will help make this easier on your dog. Establish set times for potty breaks, playing, walking and feeding. This routine will help your dog feel more comfortable, and will also help messy accidents from happening in your home.

Importance of Exercise

Although all dogs need exercise, large dogs especially need plenty if they are living in a small apartment. Although a simple daily walk is a good start, your large dog needs more vigorous exercise to get his or her heart really pumping. This is why having a dog park nearby is such a good thing. It is important to make sure your dog is getting enough exercise. For recommendations, be certain to speak with your veterinarian.

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Helping a Dog with Pancreatitis: the Natural Way

pancreatitisdog

If your dog has pancreatitis, you likely have an understanding of the seriousness of this condition. As with many things in life, prevention is key. Before we explore the topic of pancreatic disease, let’s talk about how miraculous this organ truly is. Think about this. The pancreas is relatively small organ. This little but vital organ works to keep dogs alive by assisting in digestion. It also produces insulin, which transforms energy from food and delivers it to all of the cells in the body. Without the pancreas, a dog wouldn’t be able to survive. This gland forms part of the digestive system. It has a dual function of secreting enzymes and produces hormones. Happiness and enthusiasm of life can be found by pondering the miracles found in nature.

What Is Pancreatitis, Anyway?

Quite simply, it is inflammation of the pancreas. When viewed holistically, several factors may be the cause of this condition. However, research does show that pancreatitis is much more common among dogs that eat kibble. Compared to other mammals, the digestive tract of dogs is much shorter. This means that while they are able to digest meat, organs, bones and some plant material with ease, digestion of starches becomes more difficult. Experts agree that eating heavily processed grains is not what Mother Nature intended for dogs. Any type of processed food causes the pancreas to become stressed. When the pancreas becomes overwhelmed, inflammation can occur.

When the pancreas becomes inflamed, its digestive enzymes activate prematurely. This can trigger the pancreas to “digest itself”, causing it to become even more irritated. At this point, these enzymes from the pancreas may leak into the abdomen, which can cause damage in this area and cause problems to the kidney and liver. Pancreatitis is something that needs to be taken seriously, as it can threaten your dog’s life.

About Acute Pancreatitis

When pancreatitis is labeled as acute, this means it is the most serious form of the disease. It has the ability to develop very suddenly. Recognizing the symptoms of acute pancreatitis is crucial. Your dog may lose his appetite, may be vomiting, and at times diarrhea may be occurring. Lethargy and dehydration are other common symptoms. The dog’s abdomen may seem harder than normal and sensitive to the touch. This is because the pancreas can be found close to the stomach and is near the abdomen.

Chronic Pancreatitis

With chronic pancreatitis, there may not be any symptoms. On occasion you could see slight cases of vomiting or diarrhea. With this, a slightly elevated pancreatic enzyme level could be found.

Diagnosing Pancreatitis

A blood test is needed to confirm a diagnosis of pancreatitis. A chemistry panel as well as a CBC should be conducted, as well as the testing of lipase levels. There is a relatively new test for pancreatitis available, called a canine pancreas specific lipase test. In addition to this, X-rays or an ultrasound exam may be needed to confirm the diagnosis, as there could be other reasons why the dog could be experiencing symptoms similar to those caused by pancreatitis.

Options for Treating Pancreatitis Naturally

According to Dr. Peter Dobias, a licensed doctor of veterinary medicine, here are some tips to help your dog heal from pancreatitis naturally.

  • Try switching your dog to a diet that is designed for their specific species. He says that processed food doesn’t fall into this category.
  • Dobias recommends putting energy into feeding your dog a wholesome, natural diet of raw food.
  • Try to cleanse, nourish and detox the dog’s body with a whole food supplement, known as sea greens.
  • Try giving your dog a certified organic, whole food multivitamin that is of high quality.
  • Essential fatty acids may be very helpful for your dog. Look for sources that contain salmon, krill and flax seed oil. He does not recommend any of the other fish oils as they may contain dangerous mercury and strontium.
  • Giving your dog probiotics may help to create a balance in their immune system, boost their intestinal flora and keep diarrhea from happening.
  • He suggests adding a glandular supplement. Specifically, he recommends a product known as Standard Process Pancreatrophin PM, which is designed to nourish and protect the pancreas.
  • If possible, take your dog to the chiropractor. This may help with the muscle tightness that develops when a dog has pancreatitis. A physiotherapist, osteopath or massage therapist may also be beneficial to him or her. Dr. Dobias recommends starting out going every other week, and then change to monthly when appropriate.

 

 

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Dog Body Language

dogbodylanguage

Wondering what your doggie is trying to tell you through dog body language? Understanding the body language of dogs can provide you with a lot of useful information, such as when your dog is nervous or scared, or perhaps when he or she is on edge and might be ready to act out. Along with sounds and signals, through a dog’s facial expressions and body postures, they communicate to us what is going on in their minds.

Showing Appeasing Behavior

When your dog wants to appease you, he or she may seek attention with the following behaviors:

  • Licking their muzzle or lips
  • Jumping up
  • Keeping the body lowered and curved
  • Blinking
  • Exposing their teeth, like smiling

Avoiding a Confrontation

When a dog is looking to avoid a confrontation, they may use body signals to provide a distraction of sorts, like a way for the dog to cover up the way they are actually feeling. Some examples are: yawning, scratching, sniffing, sneezing and licking. Dogs who perceive a threat and are fearful may show signs of passive submission, such as cowering and freezing their body.

Showing Stress, Discomfort or Nervousness

If a dog feels stressed and nervous, he or she may show many different types of behavior that work to either help relieve their stress, or to try to calm down a perceived threat. Although dogs yawn when they are tired, they are also much more likely to yawn when they are feeling nervous. You may think that when your dog is licking their lips, they may be hungry or have just eaten. However, a dog also will yawn when they are feeling afraid. Here are some other signs of stress or nervousness.

  • Freezing their body
  • Turning away from the perceived threat, but still looking at it with the whites of the eyes
  • Having a furrowed brow or curved eyebrows
  • Keeping the jaw tense, with the mouth closed
  • Hugging around their owner’s body
  • Keeping the tail low
  • A curved tongue
  • Panting that sounds dry or raspy
  • Shaking
  • Drooling
  • Sweaty Paws
  • Hair on the spine and neck standing on end

Showing Defensiveness

If your dog is feeling aggressive, it’s time to watch out! It is his or her way of defending themselves against a perceived threat to keep themselves safe. If the perceived threat doesn’t retreat or back away, the dog is likely to go on the offensive and bite. These behaviors are easy to identify.

  • Projecting their body forward
  • Keeping the mouth tense
  • Lips are pushed forward and vibrating when the dog is growling
  • Snapping at the air or at the skin
  • Biting: fast nipping, deep biting, biting and holding, or biting and shaking
  • Hard, staring eyes
  • Tail wagging

About Tail Wagging

Many people think that as long as their dog is wagging their tail, they are feeling happy. However, according to experts, this simply isn’t true. Yes, a dog will wag their tail when they are happy at times, but at other times as well. A dog may also wag their tail if they are aroused, overstimulated or frustrated. Here are some examples:

  • If a dog is confident or aroused, the tail will be held in the air.
  • If the dog his wagging the tail, but is barking and has a defensive body posture, face that is tense and eyes that are staring hard, it is best to back away.
  • When the tail is held low or between the legs, this shows nervousness or fear
  • If the dog holds the tail high, but it is wagging it slowly, they may be accessing the situation.
  • If the dog wags the tail like a helicopter with relaxed body movement and a wiggling bottom, this shows friendliness and that they are ready to engage.
  • Research suggests that when a dog wags their tail more to the right, they like the person. If the person is unfamiliar, the tail will wag more to the left.

Signs of a Happy Dog

If your dog shows these signs, they are happy to have your attention and may want to play!

  • A happy expression, panting and relaxed
  • Relaxed body position
  • Lying with one paw tucked under
  • Wagging the tail enthusiastically
  • Thumping the tail on the floor
  • Front end down, rear end up with tail wagging

And there you have it! It’s not that hard reading dog body language.

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Pet Diabetes: Signs and Treatment

petdiabetes3

It appears that the number of cases of pet diabetes is on the rise. According to the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine, from 2007 to 2012 there was a 32% increase in cases of canine diabetes. Pet diabetes happens when there is either a lack of insulin, or an inadequate response to insulin. Pet diabetes is a condition that often goes undetected. Here are some symptoms to watch for that may indicate your dog has diabetes.

Signs of Dogs with Diabetes

Does your dog appear to be constantly thirsty? An increased thirst is one sign of diabetes in dogs, as is increased urination. A change in your dog’s appetite is another. Weight loss, lethargy, dehydration, urinary tract infections, vomiting, chronic skin conditions, cataract formation and a sweet-smelling breath are other telltale signs of pet diabetes. If you see these signs and suspect your dog may have diabetes, have your veterinarian perform a physical examination, check their bloodwork, and perform a urinalysis.

Causes of Diabetes in a Dog

You may be wondering exactly what causes diabetes in dogs. According to WebMD, the exact cause is unknown. However, the following factors may predispose a dog to diabetes: autoimmune diseases, genetics, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, certain medications and abnormal protein deposits in the pancreas.

Specifically, female dogs and obese dogs are known to have a higher risk of developing diabetes in their later years, from 6 to 9 years of age. In addition to this, there are certain breeds of dogs that are more likely to get pet diabetes, including Australian terriers, standard and miniature schnauzers, dachshunds, poodles, keeshonds, samoyeds and golden retrievers.

Treatment for Pet Diabetes

In regards to how diabetes in pets is treated, it all depends on the severity of the case. Therapy for diabetes becomes something that is individually tailored to each dog. If the dog is seriously ill, he or she may need to be hospitalized for several days until their blood sugar is regulated. Dogs who show more stability may be prescribed an oral medication or a diet that is high in fiber that will help bring the dog’s glucose levels back to normal. In most cases, in order for insulin levels to be regulated properly, the dog will need insulin injections. If insulin shots are required, it is important to give your dog their insulin shot at the same time each day, along with feeding their meals at the same time every day. This will help to make sure your dog’s insulin levels remain stable.

Prevention of Diabetes in Pets

Logically, one may wonder if there is a way to prevent pet diabetes from happening in the first place. Unless it is inherited at a young age, diabetes in dogs is a condition that can be prevented by proper diet and regular exercise.

Concerned that your cat or dog might have diabetes? The Pet Diabetes Month website offers a free quiz to help determine if your pet is at risk. Take their quick diabetes assessment here.

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Top Pet Surgeries and their Costs

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Pet surgery is something that no pet owner wants to face. Finding affordable pet surgery is often quite a challenge, especially when a specialist needs to be called in. In cases like these, people often look for pet surgery assistance options. However, this isn’t necessary in all cases. Here are the most common types of pet surgery and their average cost.

Spay and Neuter

As you may have guessed, spaying and neutering your pet is at the top of the list of most common pet surgeries. It involves the process of removing all or part of the pet’s reproductive organs. According to Vetinfo, the cost of this pet surgery depends on the weight of your dog.

  • Weight of 1-20 Pounds, Male or Female averages at $149
  • Weight of 21-40 Pounds, Male or Female averages at $154
  • Weight of 41-60 Pounds, Male or Female averages at $159
  • Weight of 61-80 Pounds, Male or Female averages at $164
  • Weight of 80 Pounds or More, Male or Female averages at $184

Cataract Surgery

Many older dogs develop canine cataracts. In other cases, dogs are born with them. Cataracts are inherited, caused by an infection, trauma or diabetes. With cataracts, the lens of the eye loses its transparency. A white appearance forms on the eyes, making them look foggy or hazy. Cataract surgery involves the removal of this foggy lens. An artificial lens is put in to replace the natural one. If your dog needs cataract surgery, you can expect to pay between $1,500 and $3,000.

Hip Dysplasia Surgery

Seen primarily in dogs, hip dysplasia is a commonly experienced degenerative joint disease. It can cause your dog to limp, to hop when they are running, and to experience pain and stiffness in their back legs. If hip dysplasia goes untreated, it can stop the dog from being able to walk at all. If your dog has hip dysplasia, he or she may have to undergo a series of surgical treatments. There are several different surgeries for hip dysplasia, Total Hip Replacement being the most expensive. Surgeries for hip dysplasia range between $1,000 and $2400.

Gastroplexy

Treatment for the most common name of “bloat,” gastroplexy is a pet surgery that is administered to save a dog’s life. Bloating happens when a dog’s stomach expands due to an excessive amount of gas, fluid, or food that is expanding. This can happen if a dog exercises too much after eating a large meal. If not treated immediately, bloat can quickly turn into a life-threatening situation. Gastroplexy surgery involves attaching the stomach to the abdominal wall. If a gastroplexy is performed for preventative measures it only runs about $400. However, if it is done as a result of bloat, it can cost $1,200. Should there be any complications involved, gastroplexy surgery can cost up to $5,000.

If you are without pet health insurance, getting pet surgery can become quite a financial undertaking. If you are looking for pet surgery assistance, you may want to check out The Pet Fund. Although they don’t cover emergency surgeries, you can apply for assistance for surgeries related to chronic health conditions such as heart disease. You can also check out Best Friends.org, who has a state-based listing for financial assistance. Care Credit is an organization that provides veterinary financing, so you can make payments over time instead of having to come up with the funds all at once.

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Dog Urine Killing Grass: What to Do

dogurinekillinggrass

Also known as lawn burn, this happens when dog urine kills grass. Perhaps you have gotten a new dog and are noticing small brown patches in your yard and are left to wonder, “Does dog urine kill grass?” The answer is yes, it can.

Why does dog urine kill grass? It is due to the nitrogen present in dog urine. To prevent lawn burn, you need to try to reduce the amount of nitrogen that the grass is coming into contact with. According to Doctors Foster and Smith, there are several contributing factors to this scenario.

Factors That Contribute to Dog Urine Killing Grass

Females void their entire bladder in one location, instead of marking like males. So these larger puddles don’t help the situation. Logically, the larger the dog, the more urine. Dogs who are fed a diet very high in protein have more nitrogen present in their urine. Lawns that have fertilizer applied to them already have extra nitrogen, so the dog’s urine can just push the nitrogen content over the edge. Conversely, if the lawn is dry or diseased, or newly sodded or seeded are more likely to get lawn burn.

How to Keep Dog Urine From Killing Grass

  • Use a watering can to saturate the urinated spots with water.
  • Feed your dog a high-quality food that doesn’t have an excessive amount of protein.
  • Provide plenty of fresh water for your dog to drink at all times. This will dilute the urine.
  • Train your dog to urinate in a specific area that is less visible, such as a corner of your yard.
  • Keep in mind that perennial rye grasses and fescues are more urine-resistant than others. Bermuda grass and Kentucky bluegrass are more likely to be affected by dog urine.
  • Try feeding your dog a supplement that helps bind the nitrogen in their waste.
  • Apply a product to your lawn such as Spot Gone Repair & Recover.
  • Frequently water your lawn.

Dog Killing Grass Home Remedy

You may have heard several stories of do-it-yourself tricks for getting rid of the telltale brown spots in your lawn caused by dog urine. These include items such as baking soda, gypsum and dishwashing detergent. According to Colorado State University, none of these will work. They state that the only thing that can neutralize the negative effects of dog urine is water. In addition, they advise that the only sure solution to the problem is to train the dog to select a location in the yard that is covered in mulch or gravel.

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2 Golden Retriever Dogs Tend to Their Fallen Owner for 2 Days

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According to Judy Muhe of Palmdale, Florida, she owes her life to her two golden retriever dogs, Higgins and Dodger.

Here is what happened. Judy fell in her kitchen, bruising her head and shattering her shoulder. Judy is elderly, lives alone and also suffers from Parkinson’s disease. Over the next 48 hours, she drifted in and out of consciousness.

As she lay on the floor unable to get up, her golden retrievers stayed right by her side. Not only was this comforting to Judy, the dogs kept her warm on her cold tile floor. Judy told ABC news that 10-year old Higgins cuddled up against her back and 4-year old Dodger laid on her feet and legs. She says that the dogs knew she was in distress and did their best to comfort her.

Judy laid in that spot on the floor for 2 days, until her friend Kathy Jacobs became concerned when Judy wasn’t answering her phone. Thankfully, Kathy had a spare key to Judy’s house and decided to come and check on her. When Kathy entered the home, the dogs immediately ran up to the door and then ran back to Judy, showing her that she was there.

Although Judy was dehydrated and required several surgeries to repair her shoulder, Judy made it out of this desperate situation. Judy feels she owes it all to her guardian angels, her 2 golden retriever dogs.

Judy explains, “The main thing was they let me know I was not alone. I don’t know what I would have done without them. I just love my dogs so much.”

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Top Dog Apps for 2016

 

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Dog Apps

Dog apps are a great tool for all dogs and their families. If you are like many dog lovers, you may be looking for a way to connect to dog-related information in a quick and easy fashion. Dog apps are the perfect solution for this! So here we go, charge up your smartphone and take a look at the top dog apps for 2016.

iKibble

Have you ever been feasting on something and had your dog come up and look at you lovingly, hoping for a bite? In many cases, people foods won’t harm your dog. However, there are particular foods out there that are toxic to dogs, or are simply not appropriate to feed a dog. Don’t take a chance! Look it up on the iKibble dog app. Consider it to be your free peace of mind. Once you know which foods are safe for your dog, have some fun whipping them up a batch of special treats, or cook a dinner for two (or more)! Read more about dog apps below.

PetMD Services Finder

This helpful database provides you information on local dog-related needs, according to a zip code search. If you are looking for a local doggie sitter, dog groomer or dog park, PetMD has got you covered. It is also ideal to have in case of emergency. PetMD connects you to emergency clinics and veterinarians in your area. No more having to tirelessly Google different searches while you are on the go. With the PetMD Services Finder, all of the local information can be accessed with ease. This is one of the main dog apps you should be sure to include.

Puppy House Training

If you have a new puppy, it is important to keep them on a schedule. The first step is to make sure that they are pooping and peeing at regular times. This is where the Puppy House Training dog app comes in. You can set potty reminders, so you will never forget to take your puppy outside. It has a daily log to help you keep track of when your puppy goes out, and allows you to track your puppy’s progress. It also provides you with house training support for those inevitable mistakes.

Clicker Training

With the Clicker Training dog app for the iPhone, you have the perfect dog training tool at your disposal. The best thing about a clicker dog app instead of using a real clicker is that you won’t lose or misplace it! New to the whole clicker concept? It offers clicker training tutorials and connects you to YouTube training videos to make the whole thing less of a mystery.

Bark Cam

Love taking selfies with your dog? Then the Bark Cam is a must-have! It has sound effects, which really get your dog’s ears perked up and looking at the camera. You can even add fun stickers to each image and cute filters to make your picture taking experience truly unique. Share your pup’s pics with their community of 4 million dog lovers and make your doggie a star.

Doggy Datez

Turns out, there is even an app designed to help you find and set up doggy play dates with local dog owners. As you may have guessed, Doggy Datez is more about dog OWNERS becoming connected with each other than their dogs. Nevertheless, it is still a fun way to use your dog as a potential matchmaker. You start by marking your spot, within a 200 mile radius. Then you invite others to join you to visit your spot. You can even search for dog owners by gender, age, dog gender, dog age and dog breed.

These top dog apps are sure to become some of your favorites in your app library. Have your own favorite dog app?

Share it with us!

Enjoyed reading about dog apps? Share it with your friends!

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Dog Food Recall Fromm

Recall Word Red Stamp Defective Product Fix Repair

As of March 18, 2016, Fromm Family Foods of Mequon, Wisconsin announced a voluntary dog food recall of three of its products. After a careful analysis, conducted by the company itself, Fromm discovered that the three products in question contain elevated levels of vitamin D.

Recalled Products

  1. Fromm Gold Chicken Pate Dog Food in 12 oz. cans

Can case code: #11893

Individual can UPC: 72705 11892

  1. Fromm Gold Chicken & Duck

Can case code: #11895

Individual can UPC: 72705 11894

  1. Fromm Gold Salmon & Chicken Pate

Can case code: #11891

Individual UPC: 72705 11890

These products in question were shipped to distributors between December 2015 and February 2016. No other Fromm products are affected in this recall.

About the Dog Food Recall

This dog food recall is being conducted in an abundance of caution. Fromm advises that the recalled food does not contain the recommended levels of vitamins and minerals, specifically containing an excess of vitamin D. The company advises to look for symptoms in your dog only in situations where an affected product is the only food that the dog has eaten for an extended period of time. In this case, look for a decrease in appetite. Although no health problems have been reported at this time, Fromm has recommended to not feed your dog the foods that have been recalled. Fromm has notified the FDA and encouraged them to share the details of the recall with consumers.

About Vitamin D Toxicity

According to PetMD, dogs of all ages are susceptible to vitamin D toxicity, but young dogs have a higher risk. Although vitamin D toxicity usually happens when a dog eats a rodent killer, an excess of vitamin D in the diet can also cause symptoms. These symptoms may include:

  • Vomiting
  • Weakness
  • Depression
  • Loss of appetite
  • Increased thirst
  • Increased urination
  • Dark, bloody feces
  • Blood in vomit
  • Weight loss
  • Constipation
  • Seizures
  • Muscle tremors
  • Abdominal pain
  • Excessive drooling

It is unlikely that your dog will experience symptoms unless they consumed the affected product for a long period of time. As mentioned, if this is the case, monitor your dog for these symptoms.

What to Do

If you have one of the foods in question, stop feeding it to your dog. Fromm advises you to return the product where it was purchased for a full refund. If you have questions regarding the recall, contact Fromm Family Pet Foods at 800-325-6331.

 

 

 

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